Health Reports & Data

Oral Health

Goal

Prevent and control oral and craniofacial diseases, conditions, and injuries, and improve access to preventive services and dental care.

Overview

The health of the mouth and surrounding craniofacial (skull and face) structures is central to a person’s overall health and well-being.1,2 Oral and craniofacial diseases and conditions include:

  • Dental caries (tooth decay)
  • Periodontal (gum) diseases
  • Cleft lip and palate
  • Oral and facial pain
  • Oral and pharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers1,2,3,4,5

The significant improvement in the oral health of Americans over the past 50 years is a public health success story. Most of the gains are a result of effective prevention and treatment efforts. One major success is community water fluoridation, which now benefits about 7 out of 10 Americans who get water through public water systems.5

However, some Americans do not have access to preventive programs.1,2,3 People who have the least access to preventive services and dental treatment have greater rates of oral diseases.1,2,3,4,5,6 A person’s ability to access oral health care is associated with factors such as education level, income, race, and ethnicity.1

Objectives in this topic area address a number of areas for public health improvement, including the need to:

  • Increase awareness of the importance of oral health to overall health and well-being.
  • Increase acceptance and adoption of effective preventive interventions.
  • Reduce disparities in access to effective preventive and dental treatment services.

Why is Oral Health Important?

Oral health is essential to overall health. Good oral health improves a person’s ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow, and make facial expressions to show feelings and emotions.1,2

However, oral diseases, from cavities to oral cancer, cause pain and disability for many Americans.

Additional Resources

HP2020’s National Objectives for Oral Health
HHDW Reports on Oral Health

References

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. Oral health in America: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000, p. 33-59.
  2. US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. Oral health in America: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000, p. 155-88.
  3. US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A national call to action to promote oral health, Rockville (MD): National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; May 2003, p. 1 -53. (NIH Publication; no. 03-5303).
  4. Dye BA, Tan S, Smith V, et al. Trends in oral health status: United States, 1988–1994 and 1999–2004, Vital Health Stat. 2007 Apr;11(248):1-92.
  5. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Oral health: Preventing cavities, gum disease, tooth loss, and oral cancers: At a glance 2010 [Internet]. Atlanta: CDC; c2010 [cited 2010 March 8]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/doh.htm#aag
  6. US Government Accountability Office (GAO). Medicaid: Extent of dental disease in children has not decreased and millions are estimated to have untreated tooth decay. 2008 Sep. 46 p. (GAO-08-1211).
ID
OBJECTIVES AND SUB-OBJECTIVES
OH-4
Reduce the proportion of adults who have ever had a permanent tooth extracted because of dental caries or periodontal disease
State Indicator Definition:
Percentage of adults aged 45-64 years who report having had at least one permanent tooth removed. The national indicator is based on data collected during a physical examination.

State Baseline:
45.3% (2012)

Most Recent State Value:
49.7% (2014)

HP2020 Target:
National: 68.8%

National Data Source:
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

State Data Source:
Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Data Reports:
HHDW Report
HHM Report
DHHS Health Indicator Warehouse

State Indicator Definition:
Percentage of adults aged 65 years and older who report having had all their permanent teeth removed. The national indicator is limited to adults aged 65-74 years, and is based on data collected during a physical examination.

State Baseline:
6.2% (2012)

Most Recent State Value:
4.5% (2014)

HP2020 Target:
National: 21.6%

National Data Source:
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

State Data Source:
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Data Reports:
HHDW Report
HHM Report
DHHS Health Indicators Warehouse

State Indicator Definition:
Percentage of public school students in grades 6-12 and adults aged 18 years and older who reported visiting a dentist office in the 12 months prior to the survey. The youth data is divided into two groups: grades 6-8 and grades 9-12. The national indicator is defined differently as it measures visits for people aged 2 years and older, and is calculated using CMS data.

State Baseline:
Grades 6-8, 77.8% (2013)
Grades 9-12, 77.0% (2013)
Adults, 70.4% (2012)

Most Recent State Value:
Grades 6-8, 77.7% (2015)
Grades 9-12, 77.3% (2015)
Adults, 71.6% (2014)

HP2020 Target:
National: 49.0%

National Data Source:
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

State Data Source:
Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Data Reports:
HHDW Report – Youth
HHDW Report – Adults
HHM Report – Grades 6-8
HHM Report – Grades 9-12
HHM Report – Adults
DHHS Health Indicators Warehouse