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Cancer - colorectal cancer screening - adults (50-75)

Summary Indicator Report Data View Options

Colorectal cancer screening - adults (50-75) by county, 2016-2018

Why Is This Important?

Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States, and is the second leading cancer killer in the U.S. If adults aged 50 or older had regular screening tests, as many as 60% of the deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented. Recommended screening procedures include one of the following: Fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) annually; flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years with FOBT within the past 3 years; or colonoscopy every 10 years. It is recommended that screening begin at age 50; however, testing may need to begin earlier and/or more often if colorectal cancer runs in the family, or if you've been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Speak with your doctor about when you should begin screening and how often you should be tested.

Definition

Percent of adults (aged 50-75 years) who have been screened for colorectal cancer in accordance with the US Preventive Services Task Force's guidelines: (1) annual fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or fecal immunochemical test (FIT); (2) colonoscopy every 10 years; or (3) sigmoidoscopy every 5 years with FOBT every 3 years.

How the Measure is Calculated

Numerator:Number of respondents aged 50-75 years who have been screened for colorectal cancer in accordance with the US Preventive Services Task Force's guidelines.
Denominator:Number of respondents aged 50-75 years whose colorectal cancer screening status can be determined (excludes unknowns and refusals).
Indicator Data Last Updated On 09/26/2019, Published on 11/09/2021
Hawai'i Health Data Warehouse, 1960 East-West Rd, Biomed D-104H, Honolulu, HI 96822. Email: profiles@hhdw.org